Worldcarblog.com

Worldcarblog.com

Back on the road, and a run to the track for some revealing numbers.

As travel restrictions lifted, we hit the road in our 2020 Toyota Supra, and we've added more than 5,000 city and highway miles since the first update. As a result, our once-empty-road fuel economy (27 mpg average) is now more representative of real-world driving at 25 mpg. The EPA estimates 26 combined, so we're close. A couple long drives that nearly drained the tank proved the Supra can be quite miserly, returning 30 to 31 mpg.

Not only are we driving more, we had an opportunity to run to our test facility to see how this 3.0 Premium measures up against two "Launch Editions" we tested last year. There's no difference in hardware, only a 21-pound weight difference, so we didn't expect a difference in performance.

We were right; identical 0-60 mph times (3.9 seconds), the same quarter-mile times (12.5 seconds) and trap speeds were all within a half mph of one another. The three are separated by 7 feet braking from 60 mph, with ours in the middle at 103 feet. Lateral acceleration on the skidpad was a dead heat with all three posting an average of 1.01 g. On our "race track in a bottle" figure-eight test, they were separated by 0.4 second, ours bringing up the rear with a 24.3-second lap.

Supra Testing Notes

During the quarter-mile acceleration runs, the test driver commented, "It really doesn't matter if TC [traction control] is on or off, there's a just-right amount of wheelspin regardless. Launch control does the same thing, as well. Very consistent, but it can feel a little dicey until the shift to second gear. Sounds great as it upshifts at redline."

Regarding the braking test, he said, "Brakes (and tires) like a little heat as the distances grew shorter. Firm pedal, very little dive, and no squirm to speak of. Highly controlled, even from 100 mph. In order: 106, 106, 103, 104 feet." For sports cars, we do at least one stop from 100 mph to ascertain a theoretical 0-100-0 mph time. Our Supra earned a highly respectable 13.9-second time.

All things considered, the Supra is living up to its lineage, convoluted as it may be with this generation.

Source: motortrend.com

With 201 horsepower, a standard six-speed manual, and a $25,095 base price, Hyundai's new Elantra N Line is a compelling sport-compact player.

 

We suspect Hyundai's product planning department went through a few cases of the good stuff when Honda announced that the Civic Si would not return for the 2021 model year. The car Hyundai had benchmarked when creating the new 2021 Elantra N Line would be a no show for the fight. Honda says the Si will eventually return, but the temporary absence of that sport-compact icon has opened a window of opportunity for Hyundai as it releases the first performance variant of its compact sedan.

Don't confuse the Elantra N Line with the 276-hp Elantra N, which we've already driven in prototype form. That higher-performance model will be more akin to the Civic Type R than the Si when it goes on sale next fall. As with the Si, a turbocharged inline-four turns the N Line's front wheels. Its small yet willing 1.6-liter mill develops 201 horsepower at 6000 rpm but will happily rev to its 6500-rpm redline and sounds good doing it. More important when scurrying around town, its 195 pound-feet of torque peaks at just 1500 rpm and holds strong to 4000 rpm.

2021 hyundai elantra n line
 

Equipped with the standard six-speed manual transmission, the N Line pulls hard both off the line and out of tight second-gear corners, exhibiting just a hint of torque steer. The transmission's first three gears are short and tightly spaced, which translates into great responsiveness in the city. However, second gear is all done around 55 mph, and the additional gear change to third will add a couple tenths to its zero-to-60-mph time. An equally close-ratioed seven-speed dual-clutch automatic is an $1100 option. The manual's clutch and shifter are light but offer sufficient feedback, and the pedals are well placed for heel-and-toe action. Unfortunately, this 1.6-liter hangs onto revs momentarily when you let off the throttle, which can make smooth shifts difficult around town.

Built on the third generation of Hyundai's K platform, the Elantra N Line weighs about 3000 pounds with either transmission. That's about 200 pounds lighter than the similarly sized yet more powerful Volkswagen Jetta GLI, now its most natural rival. Hyundai's design team has also taken significantly more risks than VW's, what with the new Elantra's dramatically sloping roofline, sharp-edged tail, and a handful of polarizing visual elements, most notably the three body creases that intersect on its front doors. However, less imagination was exercised for the N Line's model-specific pieces, which are fairly standard sporty small-car stuff. Black mirrors and trim? Check. Blacked-out grille with a more aggressive mesh? Yup. Body-color side sill moldings? Got it. Two chrome exhaust tips, a small rear spoiler, and a new rear bumper stylized to look like a diffuser? Of course.

2021 hyundai elantra n line
HYUNDAI

Similar design clichés dot the N Line's interior. Red accents have been added to the Elantra's clean analog gauge cluster, and its three-spoke steering wheel, seats, and door panels wear plenty of red stitching. At least the red stripe on the shifter is interesting, and the sport seats look and feel right with their prominent bolsters and embossed N logos. Hyundai didn't skimp on technology, either: A wireless phone charging pad and wireless Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are all standard.

Projector headlights, LED taillights, and a sunroof are also standard, as are dark-finished 18-inch wheels wrapped in 235/40R-18 tires, either Hankook Ventus S1 RX all-season or Goodyear Eagle F1 summer rubber. The N Line shares the regular Elantra's strut front suspension but gains an independent rear end, larger front brake rotors, stiffened powertrain mounts, and revised chassis tuning. Along with firmer dampers, the anti-roll bars are stiffer and spring rates have been dialed up a whopping 26 percent in front and 71 percent in the rear versus the standard Elantra.

2021 hyundai elantra n line
HYUNDAI

Given the revisions, we were prepared for a bridle ride. But the N Line's comportment feels pleasantly compliant and exhibits good body control. Its steering ratio is spot on, and there's plenty of communication with the front tires. The N Line retains its composure when pushed hard, and its front end has good bite when turning into corners. While it doesn't have the power or intensity of the harder-core N model, it is good fun and should be able to hang with your buddy's Civic Si on curvy roads.

At $25,095 to start, the Elantra N Line is an undeniable value, undercutting the Jetta GLI by more than $2000. But the VW, which recently made our 10Best list for the second year in a row, may still have a performance edge over this Hyundai. We won't know for sure until we get an N Line to the test track, but Hyundai is clearly intent on making the new Elantra a serious player in the sport-compact segment.

Source: caranddriver.com

Friday, 04 December 2020 07:22

Audi Q3 Review

The Audi Q3 is an upmarket compact SUV that delivers owners loads of high-tech features and lots of cabin space. It’s not that enjoyable to drive, however

The Audi Q3 is a spacious and stylish family SUV with a great interior and lots of hi-tech features. It’s an alternative to the BMW X1 and Volvo XC40 and sits between the Q2 and Q5 in the enormous range of SUVs available in Audi’s line-up.

That line-up can be a bit like watching Eastenders and trying to decide which Mitchell brother is on the screen – they do look very similar. That’s good in some cases and bad in others, depending on the price they’re charging. The Q3 is, thankfully, in the sweet spot.

The Audi Q3’s grille looks like a smaller version of the Q8’s, for example, while the exterior design is similar to the Q5’s, but smaller. This kind of Russian-doll styling is common in a lot of car manufacturers, so we can’t hold too much of a grudge.

All Audi Q3s get a set of digital dials with sat-nav functionality and more, which is great to see – and the standard infotainment screen is sharp and easy to use. The Q3 scores highly for tech, as it feels like a more expensive model in that regard.

It’s a similar story when it comes to upholstery and interior materials, as the Q3 is well-built, looks smart and has some customisation options including an Alcantara trim that looks and feels great.

It has a typically high-up SUV driving position with plenty of adjustment, which means you can get comfortable quite easily. Plus there’s lots of room in the front seats and no headroom issues at all.

There’s no doubt the Audi Q3 has been inspired by the vast Q8 SUV – that giant grille, for example, makes it look just like a toddler that’s trying on its Grandparent’s dentures
Mat Watson, carwow expert

Plus, in the rear seats the Q3 has more room than you’ll find in many other cars of this size, and you can slide the rear seats forwards and backwards to prioritise either passenger legroom or boot space.

Impressively, even with the back seats in their most rearward position, there’s more space in the boot than you get in a BMW X1. With them set forward, the boot is really big and practical. Fold the back seats down and there’s easily enough room to carry a bicycle.

There are a few engines to choose from, starting with a 150hp petrol engine in the 35 TFSI model going right up to a 233hp petrol in the 45 TFSI, with 150hp and 190hp diesels in the mix as well. The entry point makes the most sense for most people as it’s better value for money.

A seven-speed automatic is available, but as it’s a bit slow to respond when you put your foot down, the manual model is absolutely fine. Some models have four-wheel drive (Audi calls it quattro) for extra grip, but it’s not necessary and adds to the cost.

Though the Audi Q3 is comfortable and composed, it’s more suited to motorways than country roads. It has a slightly stiff edge to the ride in versions with larger wheels and stiffer sports suspension, but at higher speeds, it’s smooth enough.

Light steering means it’s easy to drive, but it’s not particularly fun – a BMW X1 or Mini Countryman is a better choice for those who love driving. You get plenty of active safety kit as standard, but you’ll have to pay extra for adaptive cruise control.

The Audi Q3 is a great all-around family SUV, with strengths in the key areas buyers of these cars want. It’s spacious and has a great interior with loads of tech included, even if it’s on the expensive side. Still, you should be able to find a good deal by heading over to our deals page.

How practical is it?
The Audi Q3 might be a fairly compact SUV, but there’s loads of space inside for tall adults – the only real criticism is that there’s a large lump in the floor that cuts into a middle passenger’s foot space.

 Audi Q3 interior

The Audi Q3’s interior looks far more futuristic than in most small SUVs. It gets lots of kit as standard, too, but the most eye-catching trims and colours are reserved for top-spec cars.

Style

The Audi Q3’s interior looks very similar to what you find in the range-topping Q8 SUV. There’s a large ring of metal-effect plastic on the dashboard that’s supposed to mimic the shape of the Audi Q3’s grille and a vast slab of glossy black plastic that sits flush with the central touchscreen.

You also get a second digital display in front the steering in place of conventional dials but, unlike in the Q8, the Q3 comes with intuitive physical knobs and dials for the climate control instead of a third (and rather fiddly) touchscreen.

As standard, the Audi Q3 comes with a fairly staid selection of black, grey and silver interior trims – all of which feel suitably soft and sturdy. Under the cool hook-shaped door handles you’ll find a few hard brittle surfaces, but these are tucked down far enough that you won’t notice unless you reach down to adjust your seat. On the subject of seats, pick a sporty S-Line model and you get upgraded front seats with more supportive padding and electric adjustment.

You can spruce up the Audi Q3’s interior with 30-colour mood lighting or upgrade the dashboard trims with some embossed aluminium or unvarnished wood. Go for a top-spec Edition One model and you can also get the dashboard, doors and seat edges trimmed in suede-like Alcantara in a range of colours.

Infotainment
Every Audi Q3 comes with a dual-screen infotainment system consisting of a 10.1-inch central touchscreen and a second 10.25-inch Virtual Cockpit digital instrument display as standard. Through these, you’ll access all of the Audi Q3’s onboard features – besides the climate control which is operated using a simple row of buttons by the gear lever.

The central display – which fits almost seamlessly into the Q3’s glossy black dashboard trim – is bright and easy to read, even in direct sunlight. It responds quickly to your inputs and all the menus are simply and logically laid out. You don’t get a physical scroll wheel like in a BMW X1, however, so flicking through settings while you’re driving isn’t quite so easy.

That being said, you can access plenty of the system’s features through the digital driver’s display instead, using handy buttons on the steering wheel. These let you customise the dial graphics, change the radio station or view upcoming sat-nav directions.

It’s easy to input an address into the Audi Q3’s standard navigation system using the on-screen keyboard and it gives clear and concise directions. The 3D google maps feature is a nice touch, too – allowing you to see whether there’s a particularly nasty hill approaching over the horizon. But, it can be difficult to read place names on particularly dark sections of the map.

It’s even easier to follow directions if you upgrade the standard 10.25-inch digital driver’s display to a 12.3-inch Virtual Cockpit system. This allows you to minimise the digital dials in favour of a huge widescreen map instead.

Unlike in the BMW X1, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto come as standard so you can use your phone’s navigation apps through the Q3’s built-in screens if you aren’t a fan of Audi’s own system. These features also let you play music from your phone through the Audi Q3’s stereo without resorting to using a Bluetooth connection.

You’ll want to upgrade to the optional Bang & Olufsen stereo – even if you’re only a casual listener. This optional 15-speaker unit sounds absolutely fantastic and it’s easily loud enough to drown out any comments your passengers might have about your music tastes.

Source: carwow.co.uk

Thursday, 03 December 2020 06:36

2020 Kia Forte GT Review: Basically Fun

The verdict: Compact cars are often purchased as basic transit, and the 2020 Kia Forte answers that call, but if you splurge for a GT trim you’ll get a bit of inexpensive fun without sacrificing everyday drivability.

Versus the competition: Some compact sedans offer versions with sporty appearance packages that fail to deliver on the fun mechanics, but the Forte GT is not guilty of that. Its performance and cabin upgrades deliver enough action to help the car stand out yet keep costs reasonable.

The Forte competes in the compact sedan class against the likes of the Honda Civic, Hyundai Elantra and Toyota Corolla; see them compared. Each of those cars offers an enthusiast version: the Civic Si, Elantra N Line and Corolla Apex.

Kia’s compact sedan was redesigned for 2019 and has seen few changes since. The biggest was 2020’s addition of a sport-oriented GT trim level with a new turbocharged engine and sport suspension.

Peppy and Playful

The Forte GT is pleasantly peppy. Its upgraded engine — a 201-horsepower, turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder — hustles fairly quickly off the line, and you’ll hear it; the throaty exhaust note comes on strong and is a nice complement to the engine’s added oomph. The four-cylinder is paired with a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission that behaves nicely, with well-timed, smooth shifts; a six-speed manual is also available. Other Forte trim levels make do with the standard 147-hp, 2.0-liter four-cylinder and continuously variable automatic transmission.

Regardless of whether you choose the manual or automatic transmission, the GT’s added fun will cost you 3 mpg combined versus the standard engine: The regular Forte 2.0-liter is EPA-rated 31 or 33 mpg combined with the manual and CVT, respectively, while the GT is rated 28 or 30 mpg, respectively. The Forte GT and Elantra N Line are a bit thirstier with a manual than is the Civic Si, which is rated 30 mpg combined, but they offer more efficient automatics, which the Honda lacks. The Corolla Apex tops them all at 32 mpg with a stick shift and 34 mpg with an automatic, but it comes with trade-offs I’ll address below.

The Forte’s selectable driving modes alter its character quite a bit — for better and for worse. For extra responsiveness, pop it into Sport mode for more aggressive acceleration response and shift timing. Smart mode is designed to save gas, and it dulls acceleration and overall responsiveness.

Besides its unique drivetrain, the GT also gets a sport-tuned suspension. It handles nicely; the firm suspension deftly navigates curves with little lean, and there’s adequate shock absorption over bumps. Its steering has a quickness that further helps deliver a playful, connected-to-the-road feel.

The Forte GT is fairly well matched in terms of power against the Honda Civic Si and Hyundai Elantra N Line, which shares its engine with the Forte GT. (This comparison is most relevant because their weights are relatively similar.) Toyota’s sport-oriented version of the Corolla disappoints; like the others, the Corolla Apex has the added visual flair of a sport model and some suspension upgrades, but not enough performance goodies to make it much more entertaining to drive than a regular Corolla — which is to say, about as fun as attending a condo board meeting.

Clean, Sporty Cabin

The Forte’s clean, horizontal dashboard design appeals for its simplicity; elsewhere, the cabin strikes a jazzy tone with sport seats with red contrast stitching, a flat-bottom steering wheel, and pops of glossy black trim on the dash and doors. There’s some hard plastic on the door panels and at knee level, but most surfaces feel decently padded.

The sedan’s multimedia system is also well-done. The standard tabletlike 8-inch touchscreen sits high on the dash for good visibility. It’s responsive, and the system’s clear graphics and straightforward menu structure simplify operation.

Under the screen are several physical climate controls, which are also located within easy reach. Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone integration are standard, and a wireless charging tray for compatible phones is optional. Other available features include heated and ventilated front seats and a 320-watt Harman Kardon premium audio system.

The Forte is mid-pack in both backseat headroom and legroom, but it loses points for child-safety seat accommodations. Front legroom is tight when rear-facing car seats are in place, and installation isn’t easy; the lower Latch anchors are buried in stiff upholstery and require some muscle to access. Other compact sedans have similar legroom issues but easier-to-access Latch anchors.

According to manufacturer specifications, the Forte’s trunk space is slightly larger than its competitors’ at 15.3 cubic feet. In practice, though, it’s disappointing. The trunk is deep, but the opening isn’t very tall, so fitting anything other than small items inside is tough. Its hinges also intrude into the space, potentially crushing cargo. Its cargo net, however, is a nice way to keep smaller items from rolling around (and getting crushed).

Safety and Value

The 2020 Kia Forte is well-equipped with a lot of standard safety features. All models get a forward collision warning system with automatic emergency braking, lane departure warning, lane keep assist and a driver attention warning system.

Upper trim levels get even more standard safety equipment: a blind spot warning system with lane change assist and rear cross-traffic alert is standard on EX, GT-Line and GT trims. On the GT, adaptive cruise control and a reverse parking distance warning system are optional; they’re unavailable on other trims.

Competitors offer similar levels of standard and available safety features, but the Forte GT costs a lot less. With the automatic, it starts at $23,655 — lower than automatic versions of the Elantra N Line ($26,195) and Corolla Apex ($26,065). The Civic Si — which comes only with a manual transmission — starts at $26,155 in sedan trim. All prices include destination charges.

Budget is usually top-of-mind for compact sedan shoppers, but those willing to spend a little extra for fun will get just that with the Kia Forte GT.

Source: cars.com

 

► 400bhp, 100mpg, 0-62 in 5.8seconds
► Swedish seven seater
► Frugal and fast - but not at the same time

Back when Elon Musk was merely known for crashing his McLaren F1 and Jeff Bezos was a bookseller, Volvos were safe and sturdy cars made for ferrying around your offspring.

Fast forward to today and the brand has evolved into a stylish desirable car marque that no longer just trades off being the safest around.

Keep hitting the fast forward button and you'll see that a new Volvo XC90 is due in 2021. It'll be a hybrid and EV only affair.

With this in mind - is the XC90 worth buying still? Or should people wait for the new car?

The best hybrid SUVs - on CAR

The XC90 T8 hybrid, or Recharge for short, is the most expensive, cleanest, frugalist, and quickest car of the XC90 range. Its raison d'etre is that it's a seven-seat plug-in hybrid - something of a rarity still.

It's aimed at the middle classes who can't quite commit to a fully-electric car, but still want the tax breaks and street cred associated with one.

While there's also a hint of the Q-car about it. Lovers of stealthy performance cars will be salivating at the thought of a 2.3-tonne family-hauler cracking the 0-62mph sprint in less than six seconds.

A 400bhp, £60k Volvo hybrid with a crystal gear selector

Expensive, fast, stylish and beautifully crafted, it’s a standard-bearer for the Swedish marque in its assault on the premium establishment, a move that’s being met with more success than Volvo dared hope.

The XC90 uses Volvo’s SPA scalable product architecture. It also underpins the S90 saloon and V90 estate, while the chassis was designed from the outset to package electric powertrains. In the T8 a petrol engine in the nose drives the front wheels via an eight-speed auto gearbox. A generator sandwiched between the two rapidly cranks the petrol engine into life, boosts torque and charges the battery as required.

The cells, housed in the central tunnel a propshaft normally calls home, feed a large single electric motor on the rear axle that also generates electricity under braking. A control unit in the engine bay synchronises the two power sources, ensuring happy, efficient collaboration and all-wheel drive when required.

Does the XC90 Recharge feel 400bhp fast?

Not quite – think effortless performance rather than unlikely dragster. Mash the throttle to the carpet in Power mode and the T8 launches pretty smartly, the battery pouring power into the electric motor as the turbocharged and supercharged direct-injection 2.0-litre four slogs its guts out. As a performance powertrain it’s undoubtedly effective, the claimed 5.8sec 0-62mph feeling entirely believable, but the car’s not inconsequential weight (2343kg) blunts performance.

This kind of heavy-footed tomfoolery also feels pretty inappropriate, not because the chassis can’t cope – far from it – but because the petrol engine’s strains lack charm, shattering the XC90’s otherwise very endearing serenity. Volvo insists a more sonorous higher cylinder count would have been incompatible both with the firm’s product architecture and the wants of environmentally responsible consumers. Certainly the four-cylinder engine contributes much to the T8’s headline figures of 63-76g/km of CO2 and 83.1-100.9mpg on the combined cycle, though, after running one for six months, we can safely say the latter is an almost impossible figure.

The obscene three-figure MPG rating is synonymous with the plug-in hybrid car. We reckon if you charged religiously, and never drove more than 100 or so miles, the figure might be someway achievable. But the real hindrance to the XC90 is that when the battery is bereft of charge, you're realistically looking at a sub 30mpg car.

Volvo quotes an official electric range of 31 miles, but with day-to-day mixed driving expect more like 20.

Back to the drive modes. It's better to select the Hybrid and trade a little of Power’s throttle response and poke for improved economy and some far more agreeable peace and quiet. Either way the integration of electric and petrol power is almost seamless. At smaller throttle openings the petrol engine chiming in and out is almost undetectable, and the brake pedal is similarly well resolved, passing through the regenerative phase and into hydraulic braking with no discernible shift in resistance.

The usual PHEV functionality ensures a good degree of control: choose Pure mode to use only electric, select Braking on the gear selector for stronger regenerative braking on downhill runs, or even a lower gear for increased engine braking; use the instrument display or the dead-spot in the throttle pedal’s travel to stay on electric power, rather than accidentally triggering the petrol engine’s assistance.

High-rise limo or lively steer?

Air-suspended XC90s deliver an impressive drive, blending a cosseting ride with impressive body control. Appropriately there’s a little initial roll before the outer air struts take up the slack, lending the 5m-long seven-seater the wieldy feel of something much smaller and lighter.

Conventionally sprung XC90s manage a good impression of the same body control but lose a good deal of the ride quality, occasionally running out of answers on the kind of weather-beaten roads the UK does so well. So budget for the air suspension, which also drops the rear of the car by 50mm on demand for the easy loading of heavy furniture and arthritic dogs.

Back to that crystal gear selector

Curious timbers, machined aluminium and acres of beige leather don’t sound too promising but, almost irrespective of colour choice, the XC90’s is one of the finest interiors out there, certainly in anything like a comparable price bracket.

Fit and finish are exemplary, the design striking in a very pleasing, understated way and the overall sense of light, space and uncluttered calm the perfect ally to the T8’s potential for 31 miles of near-silent pure electric transportation. Additional NVH work has banished much of the background chatter of fans and compressors a combustion engine’s machinations normally mask, leaving an impressive and luxurious absence of noise.

Although the heating/cooling functions are controlled via the car's touchscreen. Which is annoying and fiddly on the move. Turning the heated seats on to their full power requires three stabs at the screen, for instance. And we can't help but the crystal gear selector is a bit...much.

Verdict

The XC90 is fundamentally a very fine SUV, and the hybrid powertrain has much to recommend it, not least the tax breaks afforded by its miserly CO2 output. While obviously 400bhp means it shifts like a V8.

However, for most people a diesel-engined XC90 delivers comparable if not superior economy, particularly if the battery’s never charged from the grid (50% of its existing PHEV owners don’t, according to Volvo) but the T8’s potential for both lunging bouts of acceleration and silent electric running is hugely attractive. Much like the car itself.

Since being launched, other manufacturers have caught up by offering plug-in hybrid SUVs. Audi, Range Rover, and BMW all have these in their arsenal - and all are newer too. Yet, the XC90 still delivers in being devastatingly fast and handsome, and nowhere near as audacious and flashy as them.

Source: carmagazine.co.uk

In March, Mercedes-Benz unveiled the 2021 E-Class All-Terrain Wagon complete with a handful of updates and confirmed that it is coming to the United States.

The high-riding version of the E-Class Wagon follows the same recipe of rivals like the Audi A6 Allroad and Volvo V90 Cross Country with features including an increased ride height and black body cladding. The E-Class All-Terrain also features a bespoke front grille and a distinctive skid plate. It all looks rather nice and the car was recently put through its paces by Autogefühl.
 
The example tested is the E450 4Matic All-Terrain. As such, it is powered by a 3.0-liter turbocharged inline-six with EQ Boost technology producing 362 hp and 369 lb-ft (500 Nm) of torque, while the 48-volt mild-hybrid system adds an extra 21 hp and 184 lb-ft (249 Nm) of torque, for a 0-60 mph (0-96 km/h) time in approximately 5 seconds.

Like the regular E-Class, the interior of the 2021 All-Terrain is extremely nice and filled with loads of impressive technologies. A good portion of the interior review focuses on the MBUX infotainment system that houses features like the ambient lighting and massage seats.
 
The review then shifts to the Autobahn. Thee car is put through its paces at cruising speeds of 124 mph (200 km/h), with the presenter noting that it remains stable and is very quiet.

Source: mercedes-world.com

Porsche's entry-level 911 doesn't have a big horsepower number, but it has the performance goods to justify its price.

12/1/20 UPDATE: This review has been updated with test results for a 911 Carrera equipped with the automatic.

This is very likely the least expensive new Porsche 911 you'll ever lay eyes on. At $106,290, it has a mere $7540 in options, which, if you don't believe is a picture of restraint, go spend a few minutes on Porsche's online configurator. This car had just four add-ons: a Sport Exhaust system ($2950); the Sport Chrono package, which includes launch control ($2720); Lane Change Assist, which most other automakers call blind-spot detection ($1060); and Sport Seats Plus ($810). Let's see if the extreme low end of the 911 lineup lives up to six-figure sports-car expectations.

A peak horsepower figure of only 379 from its twin-turbo 3.0-liter flat-six is not a great start toward credibility. A V-6 Camry also has a power figure that starts with a 3 yet costs a third as much, and there are many examples of more for less when it comes to maximizing underhood output.

HIGHS: Legit performance, curb weight has been kept in check, outstanding highway fuel economy.

But the 911 is deceptive. In the new-for-2020 992-generation 911, an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission—PDK in Porsche parlance—replaces the previous seven-speed unit. Its general brilliance in terms of both quickness and smoothness is familiar, although the car we drove did bobble a couple of shifts before it was fully up to temperature. Also familiar is Porsche's simple and extremely effective launch-control function, which revs the engine to 5000 rpm before dropping the hammer and perfectly slipping the clutch. The engine speed never drops below 4000 rpm as the car makes a smooth and very swift departure. And it is happy to repeat this launch-toward-the-horizon routine just as often as you'd like. Our test car made consistent, repeated passes of 3.2 seconds to 60 mph and 11.5 seconds through the quarter-mile, which are 0.1- and 0.3-second quicker, respectively, than the 2017 911 Carrera with the PDK that we previously tested. Those results also make the base car just 0.3-second slower than the 443-hp Carrera S in both measures.

Besides the phenomenal performance bargain that is the latest Chevrolet Corvette, any sports car that outruns the 911 costs substantially more. One reason for its more-with-less performance is that the 911 has kept its weight gain in better check than many of its peers. This car weighs just 57 pounds more than before, making it roughly 300 pounds lighter than today's Corvette. Despite adding inches and turbos, the 911 doesn't weigh even 100 pounds more than the 15-year-old 997-generation cars.

Excellent Fundamentals
In addition to straight-line acceleration, the fundamentals of a great sports car are all here. The 911's buildup in steering effort is just right, and it's constantly atwitter with road-surface information. This is electrically assisted steering done properly. Interestingly, the lid of the center console bin is surprisingly talkative, too. Resting an elbow there intercepts the communicatory tingles of what the car happens to be trampling over at the moment. The 911 also continues to prove the point that seats don't need a lot of adjustments. The headrest on our lightly optioned car is fixed, and there's manual fore-aft, and power adjustment for height and seatback angle and bottom height. That's it, and yet they fit both the short and the tall commendably well. The additional bolstering of the $810 Sport Seats Plus option is soft enough to not be restrictive nor fatiguing on longer drives. Brake feel is nigh on perfect, with telepathic responses and no lost motion. Aided by its rear-heavy weight distribution, the 911's stopping distances of 139 feet from 70 mph and 277 from 100 mph are up there with the best of the best.

LOWS: Base interior has some cheapness, even lightly optioned 911s cost six figures.
We appreciate that changing the 911's drive mode doesn't cause the steering effort or ride control to go overboard in either direction. The tweaks in its calibrations are subtle, and there isn't a bad mode. The only element that makes us roll our eyes is the three artificial-sounding pops that accompany a lift of the throttle in Sport mode, which disappear in Sport Plus. Both sporty modes raise the idle speed from 600 to 800 rpm for a little extra responsiveness. Those who listen for it can hear the turbo hiss from the blow-off valve, but this latest twin-turbo 3.0-liter retains the gritty flat-six undertones that we love, no doubt emboldened by the optional Sport Exhaust on our car. Every 911 has a little piece of the 9000-rpm GT3 rock.

As far as sports cars go, the 911's ride smoothness is reasonable. But on under-maintained roads, it can get clompy over bumps and pavement seams, especially with the narrower sidewall and higher-pressure rear tires. Remember that the 992 went to a staggered-diameter wheel arrangement with 19-inch fronts and 20-inch rears as standard and available 20/21s.

When not wailing, the engine settles below 1800 rpm at 75 mph, allowing for an outstanding 33 mpg on our highway fuel-economy loop, the best result from any 911 we've ever run. That's 2 to 3 mpg better than its 992 S and 4S siblings and also 3 mpg better than the best previous-gen 991 (a Carrera 4 automatic). Despite the improved real-world fuel economy, for some unknown reason the EPA values took a huge hit in the 992 generation, dropping from a 30-mpg highway estimate to 24 for a base car with the automatic transmission.

Entry-Level Innards
Base also means a uniformly grained black interior, which, although soft to the touch, is not as convincing in the six-figure space as are the leather-upgrade options that start at $2840. The only thing breaking up the monotony is the knurled gray trim extending from the door handle and on the ridge under the center screen running across the dash.

Surrounding the shifter is a large area of stark piano-black trim, which no amount of money can fix, as even the $204,850 Turbo S doesn't fill in any of its blankness. This is a carryover from the four-door Panamera, which populates this area with controls. There are window-switch blanks, too, as Porsche is deploying shared hardware across car lines with different door counts. A big, beautiful mechanical tachometer remains in the middle of the 911's now otherwise digital gauge cluster. But we miss the depth of the previous mechanical gauges that flanked it.

Also new on the 992 are power door handles that pop out to facilitate opening. Our early-build car, however, didn't have the $550 Comfort Access option that prompts them to present themselves automatically when you approach the car. Having to get the fob out of your pocket to actuate the handles and then squirreling it right back away because keyless ignition is standard is the kind of slight annoyance that we think people who plunk down $100K on a car will find obnoxious. Porsche apparently agreed, as it made Comfort Access standard mid-way through the 2020 model year.

Of course, the 911 retains its familiar small rear seats, an all-important point of justification to wannabe sports-car buyers with small children. That means in addition to outperforming and outdriving most of its peers, it also outseats them. Yes, even the base 911 resoundingly stacks up as a six-figure sports car. Although we would feel compelled to upgrade the interior a little if it were our money.

Source: caranddriver.com

Page 1 of 14

Disclaimer I

All the information on this website is published in good faith and for general information purpose only. Website worldcarblog.com does not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability and accuracy of this information. Any action you take upon the information you find on this website (worldcarblog.com), is strictly at your own risk. will not be liable for any losses and/or damages in connection with the use of our website.

DISCLAIMER II

Material downloaded from the Internet is considered publicly available unless otherwise stated. In the event that there is a problem or a copyright error on a particular material, copyright infringement has been done unintentionally.

Upon presentation of proof of copyright, the disputed material will be immediately removed from the site.

Top