Displaying items by tag: Ford

Wednesday, 20 October 2021 08:20

New Ford Mustang Mach-E GT 2021 review

With 480bhp and a 310-mile range, does the new Ford Mustang Mach-E GT offers the perfect blend of performance and practicality? We find out...

 
 
Verdict

The Ford Mustang Mach-E GT proves that EVs can be engaging – to an extent. The performance is a given, but the sharp steering and extra agility in Untamed mode help the GT’s case. However, the mass means this is only true up to a point, although the practicality on refinement on offer, mixed with genuinely usable range and respectable charging, make the GT a solid flagship for Ford’s first bespoke electric model line and a good electric SUV.

Ford has long been known for taking its run of the mill family cars and souping them up into something special. This is the fast Ford recipe, so it’s no surprise that the Blue Oval is taking a similar approach in the age of electrification, and the Mustang Mach-E GT is its first hot EV.

The strength of the Mustang nameplate means that a performance variant should sit naturally here, so the Mach-E GT boasts more power and torque, offering 480bhp and 860Nm respectively. It’s dual-motor powertrain gives strong traction off the line for a 3.7-second 0-62mph time, meaning it’s easily a match for the Tesla Model Y Performance.

On the move it feels it. As with many performance-focused electric cars, the throttle pedal’s map means you get a massive hit of torque with only a little travel and instant response to your inputs, so the GT romps forwards with an incredible urgency.

There are caveats, however. As long as you have the Mustang’s mass moving the response is good; this big EV’s relatively high kerbweight, at 2,273kg, means from a standstill it takes a little coaxing, while the thump also tails off at higher speeds. But at anything from town to motorway velocity, the Mach-E GT is more than rapid enough.

The enhanced powertrain is joined by some chassis upgrades in the form of Ford’s MagnaRide 2 adaptive suspension set-up, while 385mm Brembo brakes help stop the bulky machine and rein in its extra performance – but these additions have also been tuned with fun in mind, Ford claims.

Ultimately, that high weight means that the Mach-E GT is compromised; its straight-line punch is startling, but nothing we haven’t seen before from the likes of Tesla, while, despite the chassis tweaks, its mass is still obviously apparent in corners as you start to push the GT harder.

The steering is positive though, with a nice, fast response and relatively good grip, but it’s never truly engaging like the best fast Fords from history have been. You can feel some lethargy in quick direction changes, but it’s still not too bad for a big, battery powered SUV, and we should credit Ford with trying to inject some interest for keen drivers. In areas it has been successful.

 
There are Whisper, Active, Untamed and Untamed Plus driving modes to choose from that subtly change the car’s character from a greater focus on refinement to a greater focus on fun, altering the car’s torque delivery and chassis settings.

You notice the difference as the latter offers an extra edge of adjustability that deserts some of its EV rivals, tightening its line noticeably on the exit of bends as you apply the power. Untamed Plus also preps the drivetrain for repeated high-power deployment. Exploit this punch frequently though, and you’ll not get near the claimed 310-mile range on a full charge. The GT is powered by a 98.7kWh battery, of which 88kWh is usable, while 150kW rapid charging capability means a 10 to 80 per cent top-up takes 45 minutes.

 
 
 
Drop the GT back into Whisper mode and refinement is improved, making this sportiest Mach-E yet a sound cruiser on the smooth tarmac of our Croatian test route.

The chassis is just compliant enough, with enough suspension travel to soak up smoother, more flowing bumps sweetly. However, riding on 20-inch wheels the worst imperfections in the road surface do cause a shudder, and the firmer set-up to control the Mustang’s mass and deliver an engaging edge means that it does feel stiff at times.

Along with the standard-fit alloys, the GT also features more bespoke trim, including Ford Performance seats with extra bolstering to deal with the higher cornering forces. There are also body-coloured wheel arches, redesigned bumpers bespoke to the GT, a 3D-effect grille in grey, and two new body colours – Cyber Orange and Grabber Blue.

Of course, the interior is still dominated by the central 15.5-inch Tesla-style touchscreen, which features Ford’s SYNC4 infotainment with connected nav. It’s an intuitive system to use and responds quickly, although with nowhere to anchor your hand it’s not always the easiest to use on the move. The letterbox-style 10.2-inch digital display behind the steering wheel is delightfully simple and easy to read, though.

GT spec inherits the Mach-E AWD Extended Range’s list of standard kit, so wireless phone charging, adaptive cruise with lane centring, all-round parking sensors and a 360-degree camera, dual-zone climate control, heated seats and a heated steering wheel, adaptive LED headlights and plenty of safety kit are all fitted. But then you’d expect as much given the price.

The tech is fine, but the £65,080 Mustang Mach-E GT could offer some higher quality materials in places compared with similarly priced premium rivals, such as the Jaguar I-Pace.

There’s also a hands-free powered tailgate, which reveals a 402-litre boot. Practicality is boosted by the 100-litre ‘frunk’ (great for storing charging cables), while room in the rear is fine despite the Mach-E’s slightly swoopier coupe-like profile, which the GT’s bespoke styling elements enhance to good effect.

(https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/ford/mustang-mach-e/356340/new-ford-mustang-mach-e-gt-2021-review)

Published in Ford
Wednesday, 13 October 2021 07:51

Ford Equator Sport

Ford will soon officially offer the new Equator Sport in China, a shorter version of the existing Equator SUV model.

Unlike the Equator with three rows of seats, the new Equator Sport has room for five passengers, and in terms of dimensions Ford Equator Sport is 4630 mm long (- 275 mm compared to Equator), 1935 mm wide (+ 5 mm), high 1706 mm (- 49 mm) and has a wheelbase of 2726 mm (- 139 mm).

The weight ranges from 1600 to 1630 kg, and customers will be able to get wheels of 18, 19 or 20 inches.

The 1.5-liter EcoBoost turbo petrol engine with 170HP and 260 Nm, with an 8-speed automatic transmission and front-wheel drive, was chosen for the drive.

Published in Blog/News
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Thursday, 07 October 2021 06:01

Ford Fiesta Active review

With a strong driving experience and trendy SUV styling, the Fiesta Active has a lot to recommend it – but the standard car is cheaper

 
 
The SUV boom shows few signs of stopping any time soon, and manufacturers have tried to cash in as much as possible. Ford not only sells ‘proper’ SUVs like the Kuga, but also jacked-up Active versions of the Fiesta, Focus and Tourneo Connect (plus, previously, the KA+ city car).

The Ford Fiesta Active brings a slightly higher ride height than the standard Fiesta, not to mention roof rails and cladding around the wheel arches to make it look tougher. In pretty much all other respects, it’s the same as the standard Fiesta and features the same qualities.

About the Ford Fiesta Active

It’s another option to consider if you’re after a small SUV like the SEAT Arona, Renault Captur, Peugeot 2008 and the Citroen C3 Aircross – though it’s slightly smaller than all these models. Ford also sells two small SUVs of its own: the EcoSport and the big-selling Puma.

Good things, though, often come in small packages, and that’s true of the Fiesta Active. Because despite having a ride height that’s 18mm taller than the Fiesta on which it’s based, the Active has had its track widened by 10mm. This translates into a planted feel on the road, fun cornering and a car that’s generally true to the Fiesta’s ethos. All in all, it’s an appealing and likeable small SUV.

The Fiesta Active has two trim levels: the Active Edition and Active X Edition. If you’re familiar with the standard Fiesta range, Active Edition is based on Titanium and features sat nav and cruise control, but adds some extra (mostly aesthetic) trinkets. Active X, like Titanium X, has more equipment by way of keyless entry and a B&O sound system.

In terms of engine choice, you’re limited to three power outputs of a 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol engine. Versions with 123 or 153bhp come with mild-hybrid technology to reduce fuel consumption, and the former is also available with a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic alongside the standard-fit six-speed manual. On Active Edition models, you can also choose a non-hybrid 99bhp version of the engine.

Both the Ford Fiesta and SUVs are incredibly popular, so combining the two to make the Ford Fiesta Active must have seemed like a no-brainer for Ford. The company expects 15 per cent of the Fiestas it sells to be the Active variant, after all. But while some may have feared a taller Fiesta would lose the handling finesse Ford’s evergreen supermini has long been known for, in truth, the Fiesta Active is similarly enjoyable to drive. 

It is, to be fair, more expensive than a standard Fiesta, but the Active gets a plusher entry-level trim, so this isn’t felt quite as keenly as it might be. There’s room for five adults (at a push) inside, while the Fiesta Active gets the same well-designed cabin and up-to-date eight-inch Sync 3 infotainment system as the standard Fiesta. As a bridge between supermini and full-on small SUV, with the impressive qualities of the Ford Fiesta thrown-in, it makes a lot of sense.

Engines, performance and drive

 Agile, competent and above all fun, the Fiesta Active is a welcome addition the growing band of supermini-based SUVs

The battle car companies face when designing SUVs is that if they make a taller car, they tend to raise its centre of gravity. This, in turn, will lead to more body roll when cornering, which is an enemy of a fun driving experience – something that wouldn’t bode well with the Fiesta’s reputation.  

Ford must have been well aware of this when designing the Active, so while the car has rugged plastic wheel arches, roof rails and more sturdy-looking bumpers, it actually rides just 18mm taller than the Fiesta hatch. To further minimise the impact an SUV stance might otherwise have and to compensate for the slightly taller frame, the Active’s track has been widened by 10mm.

These design elements are worth knowing, because they mean that if you’ve driven the standard Fiesta, the Active doesn’t deviate too much from that car’s impressive handling characteristics. There is a fraction more body lean when cornering, but nowhere near enough to dent the Active’s overall handling prowess. It also has an almost identical – albeit marginally higher – driving position to the Fiesta, plus the same snickety gearbox and sharp steering. 

All models come with what Ford terms “rough road suspension” and a driving mode selector with Eco, Normal and Slippery settings. It’s unlikely the Fiesta Active will get you hugely far off the beaten track, but the slightly raised stance should make taking it into a field, for example, less nerve-racking than it would be in a conventional supermini. The car’s underside will also be that little bit further out of harm’s way when negotiating urban obstacles like speed humps and kerbs. 

Engines, 0-60 acceleration and top speed

Ford only offers the Active with a 1.0-litre three-cylinder turbocharged petrol engine, although a 1.5-litre diesel was available early in the car’s life. The petrol currently comes in 99, 123 and 153bhp formats.

Choose one of the EcoBoost petrols and you’ll be getting an eager powerplant. The slightly gruff nature intrinsic to three-cylinder engines gives the EcoBoost a pleasing amount of character when accelerating, but once on a cruise it’s a hushed companion, and an all-round solid performer. Note the least powerful petrol isn’t available with the better-equipped trim.

Performance, naturally, varies depending on which EcoBoost configuration you choose. The 99bhp version takes 10.8 seconds to go from 0-62mph, the 123bhp version shrinks this to around 9.5 seconds, while the 153bhp engine does the same in 8.9 seconds. We’d argue the 123bhp unit is the one to go for though: it’s swift enough for most needs, and you can have fun wringing out its power, while staying on the right side of the law. A sweet-changing six-speed manual gearbox is standard across the range, with a six-speed auto offered as an option, but only with the 123bhp petrol engine.

MPG, CO2 and Running Costs

 The Fiesta Active is slightly less economical than its hatchback sibling, but it should still be a cheap car to run

Remember those compromises we mentioned earlier about SUVs being less agile than more established body styles? The same theory applies to economy. Add size and you reduce efficiency – partly due to extra weight, and partly due to a taller car being less aerodynamic. 

 
Fortunately, because the Fiesta Active is only slightly larger than the Fiesta, and only weighs an extra 100kg or so, its efficiency losses are pretty minimal.

Specify your Active with the 1.0-litre petrol engine and official economy sticks around the mid-50s, with the 123 and 153bhp mild-hybrid engines returning 56-57mpg, and the 99bhp version managing 53.3mpg.

The Active stands up pretty well to the competition where economy is concerned, too. The SEAT Arona officially manages 52.3mpg with the base 94bhp petrol engine, but the 148bhp engine with an automatic gearbox offers an MPG figure in the mid-40s.

As far as road tax is concerned, you’ll pay £145 for the mild-hybrid engines and £155 for the 99bhp petrol engine once the car’s a year old. The first year’s tax is wrapped up in the cost of the car.

Insurance

Insurance for your Ford Fiesta Active should be cheap enough. The Active starts in group 10 out of 50, while the 123bhp engine sits in group 15 and you’re looking at group 17 for the 153bhp unit - regardless of the trim level you choose. Cover shouldn’t be expensive, either way, and should be slightly cheaper than it would be with the SEAT Arona, which sits in groups 8 to 18. 

If cheap insurance is the goal, though, bear in mind choosing a Fiesta hatchback instead of the Active will get you more affordable cover: the Fiesta Trend sits in group 4 – though only if you specify it with the unenthusiastic 74bhp petrol engine.

Depreciation

Our experts predict the Fiesta Active will retain an average of 42.56 per cent of its value after three years and 36,000 miles, which is roughly the same as the standard, Fiesta. Our choice, the B&O Play model with the 99bhp EcoBoost engine, should hold onto 36.5 per cent of its value, while the 118bhp and 138bhp petrols will be more resistant to depreciation - though they’ll cost you more to buy in the first place.

Interior, design and technology

 The Fiesta Active features the same interior design as the Fiesta hatch, so it’s up to date and ergonomically sound

When the new Fiesta launched in 2017, its new interior put criticism of the outgoing model’s button-heavy cabin to rest – so it’s no surprise Ford has stuck with the same layout for the Active model. 

The driving position, naturally, is ever so slightly higher than it is in the standard Fiesta, but your feet and arms adopt an almost identical position, and you’d be hard pushed to tell much of a difference between the two cars from behind the wheel. This is a good thing, though, as it means the gearlever is where you instinctively reach for it and feels satisfyingly chunky, the steering wheel sits comfortably in your hands, and the pedal box can accommodate even larger feet.

Interior quality is decent enough. The Volkswagen Polo feels plusher, sure, but in general the Fiesta Active acquits itself well. Unique upholstery patterns help it stand out from the crowd. As is common in the supermini class, lower down in the dashboard there are scratchy plastics, but higher up things are more pleasant, and softer to the touch.

The range starts with the Fiesta Active Edition. This includes a leather steering wheel, keyless start, sat nav, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, cruise control, rear parking sensors and a range of online features through the FordPass Connect modem. For most buyers, we’d say this is the trim level to pick as it offers a generous level of standard equipment.

Top-spec Active X Edition cars add power-fold mirrors, part-leather seats, an upgraded climate control system, auto high-beam assist and a B&O sound system. Active X is a further £2,500 or so over the Active Edition though.

Individual options include an opening panoramic sunroof for £995 (note that this means you lose the roof rails), full LED headlights for £700, pop-out door-edge protectors for £100 (worth having) and a £300 winter package.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment

Ford’s Sync 3 infotainment system may not be the best in the business but it still has a lot to recommend it. It features physical shortcut buttons at its left and right edges to easily bring up the radio volume, for example, while the central screen hosts large, easy-to-prod icons, and there are physical play/pause and skip buttons at the screen’s base. 

Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are included in the Sync 3 system, as is a physical knob for the volume and power – no prodding at a screen for these functions. Helpfully, there’s also a button that turns the screen off without shutting the entire system down – useful if you’re travelling at night and want to avoid screen glare while you listen to the radio.

Practicality, comfort and boot space

 
The Fiesta Active is a pretty practical supermini-cum-SUV, but don’t go thinking it’s a commodious car

The latest Ford Fiesta has a more spacious cabin than its predecessor, and the Active continues to make the most of these gains. Although five adults will be a squash, this is true of most cars of a similar size, which tend not to be bought by drivers who regularly carry a full complement of passengers. 

Legroom, headroom and passenger space

As with similarly-sized cars, those in the rear of the Fiesta Active will be forced to adopt a relatively upright seating position, and front-seat occupants will have to be considerate of how far they have their seats forward if adults are behind them.

While the Fiesta Active makes a strong fist of the space its small dimensions provide, and young families should do well with it, if you want to maximise the amount of interior space your small car offers, look into the Honda Jazz– it’s the epitome of clever packaging.  

Boot 

At 311 litres with the rear seats up, boot space in the Fiesta Active is identical to the Fiesta hatch. Drop the seats in the Active and luggage space grows to 1,093 litres. These figures are reasonable, if nothing to write home about. The SEAT Arona, for comparison, offers 400 litres of luggage space with the rear seats up, while the Citroen C3 Aircross has 520 litres if you slide its rear seats forward. 

Towing

Ford will fit the Fiesta Active with a tow bar for £225 – though not in conjunction with the optional panoramic sunroof. So equipped, the Active will tow up to 1,000kg, and will do so most comfortably if you choose the 118bhp 1.5-litre diesel engine.

Reliability and Safety

 Ford offers a decent range of safety equipment with the Fiesta Active, though its warranty is only average

The Ford Fiesta was awarded the full five stars for safety by Euro NCAP, and this should apply to the Active variant. Adult occupant protection was rated at 87 per cent, child protection was similarly strong at 84 per cent, and safety assist was given 60 per cent.

 

Go for the Active X Edition model and you’ll get traffic sign recognition (helpful for sticking to the speed limit), auto-dipping headlights and fatigue detection. A £350 ‘Exclusive Pack’ adds this tech to the Active Edition, plus adaptive cruise control.

The Driver Assistance pack, meanwhile, bundles adaptive cruise control, autonomous emergency braking (which operates at speeds up to 50mph), blind-spot detection, auto park assist and a reversing camera. It’s not cheap, costing £600 or £900 depending on trim level, but this kit is worth having. 

It seems a lot of Fiesta owners aren’t particularly enamoured with their cars, according to our 2021 Driver Power owner satisfaction survey. Rated 68th in our list of the top 75 cars on sale, the Fiesta didn’t score that highly in any one area. The best score was for low running costs, but neither the engine or the Ford’s reliability impressed.

The results aren’t any better for the wider Ford brand, which flopped to a 25th-place finish out of 29 manufacturers.

Warranty 

Ford’s three-year, 60,000-mile warranty is average for the industry, A number of other manufacturers, including Toyota, Kia and Hyundai, offer longer, more generous policies.

Servicing

Ford’s fixed-price service plans come in a number of flavours. A basic two-year plan covering one service is £260, and high-mileage drivers can opt for a two-year/two-service policy for £500. A three-year/two service policy is £530.

(https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/ford/fiesta/active-suv)

Published in Ford
Wednesday, 29 September 2021 09:27

Ford Evos (for China)

Ford already stopped production of the American Fusion last year, while at the end of March 2022, the production of its European brother Mondeo will stop.

The company announced earlier that it would stop producing the current Mondeo (limousine and caravan) at a factory in Valencia, Spain, next year, due to growing changes in customer preferences. In other words, due to the growing popularity of SUV / crossover models and the decline in interest in classic sedans.

On the other hand, this Ford Evos, a serial version of the eponymous concept, has already been introduced in China as a replacement.

It is a cross-liftback model 4920 mm long, 1920 mm wide, 1600 mm high and with a wheelbase of 2945 mm, while the wheels are 19 and 20 inches.

The equipment also includes a panoramic roof, automatic braking system, lane maintenance, Ford BlueCruise autopilot, 12.3-inch digital instrument panel, as well as a large screen Sync + 2.0 multimedia system.

Under the hood is a 2.0 EcoBoost turbo petrol with 238hp and 376 Nm (acceleration to 100 km / h takes 6.6 seconds), with an eight-speed automatic transmission and front-wheel drive.

Changan Ford is in charge of production in China, and the start of sales is announced for the fourth quarter of this year.

The question remains whether Evos will be sold in other markets as well. For now, only China has been announced, but a few months ago, some sources mentioned the possibility that this novelty in Europe might be sold as a Mondeo Evos, as well as that it will have a different rear part compared to the Chinese Evos.

Published in Blog/News
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Monday, 20 September 2021 09:05

Ford Bronco may even arrive in Europe!

It would be a very pleasant surprise for the American brand.

The new Bronco has just started its career on the other side of the Atlantic and has already made serious earthquakes in the field of off-road vehicles, but the real ones, and not some make-up SUV models. There are few such four-wheelers today, I can count them on my fingers, so Bronco was warmly welcomed due to Ford's courage to return to this segment.

Ford's ace is currently out of reach of European customers, but that does not mean that the situation in that area will remain unchanged. Jim Farley, the executive director of the American giant, thinks that Bronco would do well on the Old Continent…

“I see these mighty Defenders, so I believe there are opportunities for the Bronco as well,” Farley said. He added that a decision is currently being made on the final placement in this part of the world, with Ford's European branch having the last word.

"We are waiting for Ford of Europe to break whether or not the Bronco will," said the first man of Ford. If the Bronco arrives on these shores, it will most likely remain available in continental Europe, with no placement in the UK.

In that case, Ford’s SUV would be pitted against Jeep’s Wrangler, Land Rover Defender, and several other members of this small segment.

If Ford of Europe says "yes" to the arrival of the Bronze on the Old Continent, then this model could most likely appear in 2023, because due to the current crisis with microchips, it is unrealistic to expect this four-wheeler in our region earlier.

 

Published in Blog/News
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Friday, 13 August 2021 06:29

Ford GT soon with a new engine?

Ford GT is a very common topic on worldcarblog.com. As one of the biggest icons of the automotive industry, almost every news about this athlete is often accompanied by a mountain of comments, and the public interest is those examples from the 1960s that dominated the racetracks.

But it should not be forgotten that the GT also exists in a modern edition. It all started in 2003 when it debuted on the centenary of Ford, and the second generation has been on sale since 2016. The company intends to end production after next year and in this second generation 1,350 copies will find a new owner.

Although the GT is highly valued and respected around the world, there are those who believe that its six-cylinder engine does not fit such a vehicle. We doubt that anyone will have any objections to the power, since the 3.5-liter gasoline engine develops as much as 660 "horsepower" and enables acceleration from zero to 100 km / h in three seconds with a maximum speed of 346 km / h. Ford has invested large sums of money in its EcoBoost technology, so what better way to show their power than a supercar that will "iron" the competition from Italy, Germany and the rest of the world.

But as colleagues from the Autoblog site write, maybe the American giant is preparing something big for the end or it is already working hard on the third generation GT. Namely, in the federal state of Michigan, a prototype was caught that does not sound like it has "only" six cylinders under the hood. It didn’t take long before speculation started, and Americans as Americans hastily concluded that the company was preparing some special offer with a V8 engine.

At least Ford has plenty of them, from the standard 5.0-liter Mustang atmosphere, to the more powerful 5.2-liter with 760 horsepower in the Shelby GT500 configuration, to the all-powerful 7.3-liter sold as a separate item. and proved extremely popular in hot rod culture. The tested prototype also has a significantly larger spoiler, so there is no doubt that it will provide even better performance.

At the end of the day, imagination is one thing, but reality is quite another. The fact is, as we mentioned, that Ford has invested large sums of money and time in EcoBoost technology and will certainly not give it up so easily. At the same time, the GT was developed from day one with a 3.5-liter petrol, so any larger engine would only damage the vehicle’s balance and require major changes in terms of suspension, brakes, mass distribution and more. So at the end of the day, we will probably see some special edition of this athlete, but again, expect six cylinders under the hood.

Published in Blog/News
Tagged under

One car used to shoot the movie "Ford v Ferrari" will be sold at auction.

The movie "Ford v Ferrari" appeared in cinemas in 2019, and won two Oscars. It is a passionate and exciting drama about the battle between Ford and Ferrari at the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in the late 1960s, and now wealthy fans can own one of the used cars.

In fact, it is one of the six replicas of the Ford GT40 used during the filming, and the car will be sold at auction in September.

This car carried No. 3 Gurney Day in the 24 Hours of Le Mans race scene and then No. 88 by William Wonder for the 24 Hours of Le Mans race scene. It is one of six cars made by Race Cars Replicas in Michigan for the purpose of shooting the film. The replicas have the precise specifications of the 1966 Ford GT40, and it is also the only car with a chassis number which means it can be registered and driven on public roads.

The photos show a reddish-orange car with gold rims and stickers typical of race cars. The interior is stripped and done in black, the steering wheel is on the right, and the gear lever is placed between the driver and the door.

The car is powered by a 5.7-liter V8 engine paired with a 6-speed manual transmission through which power is transmitted to the rear wheels. Strength figures have not been revealed, but they should be impressive.

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